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How to handle traveling with kids

How to handle traveling with kids

Do you secretly wish you had the chance to travel as you used to before having children?

 

The fact that now you have kids doesn’t mean you can’t do it.

Some people may think it’s not possible to have a relaxing vacation with kids, but if you plan in advance and consider some helpful creative ideas, traveling with your children can become the best experience in your life.

Vacationing with your kids can be a good way to pause the daily routine and get to appreciate each other more.

However, it’s important to consider that during the trip there will be some moments of impatience, tears, drama, and unfulfilled expectations. But don’t let that disappoints you and keeps you from enjoying the adventure of a lifetime.

These tactics can help you make your trip easier for you and your kids.

 

Tips for road trip with older kids:

  • Books on CD. You can listen to them for some minutes, and make pauses to discuss and comment.
  • Surprises. Stop along the road, or a surprise them with a road game to play.
  • Goodie bag. Load up a bag with different snack options, and some new toys from the dollar store.
  • Pack your meals. You don’t need to spend extra money on restaurants. Pack a loaf of bread and some PB&J, or cheese slices, so you have the excuse to stop and make the sandwiches.
  • Keep the drinks down to a minimum. Keep your kids hydrated, but don’t let them drink too much liquid so you don’t have to stop every 30 minutes.
  • Be flexible. Sometimes, you may need to change your plans and skip a planned stop or add another one. Most of the best memories are made when you go with the flow. Having a plan is important, but keep it adjustable.
  • Bring plastic bags and some ‘clean up’ supplies. You will need them for trash, regular spills, or just in case someone gets sick.
  • Bring baby wipes. Even if you don’t have a baby, they always useful.

road trip goodie bag

Road tripping with an infant:

  • Have an extra set of the necessities. Make sure you have the diaper bag stocked with extra clothing, extra food, extra pacifiers, and extra patience. Since your little one will be out of their routine, you can expect them to be a little fussy and “needy”.
  • Don’t plan too much. Limit every outdoor activity to a few hours so your baby isn’t out there too long. Plan road trips for closer destinations, and take extra time for stops so you can take care of your little one’s needs.
  • Bring snacks for you. It’s not easy to get the nutrition you need while traveling with your little one. Pack some high protein snacks and power yourself.
  • Don’t over pack. Leave most of the baby gear at home and just be sure to have what you need to get your destination. You can buy diapers and wipes when you get there.
  • Plan for naps. Bring a board game, a deck of cards, or a good book to hang out in the hotel room while your little one takes a nap. Try to keep the nap routine the same.
  • Bring a white noise machine. Start using one at home when it’s time to sleep so your baby gets used to it. The noise will help your little one get asleep even in an unfamiliar place.

road trip with an infant

Considering all these tips, you should be ready to get out with your little ones and have the best vacation ever.

 

Did you like this article? You can find more interesting topics in our blog www.tip4mom.com

Visita también nuestro sitio en Español www.paratimami.com

 

Janita

Source: www.mom365.com

How can I teach my child that making fun of others is wrong?

How can I teach my child that making fun of others is wrong?

It’s very important to teach our children never to make fun of others. Children should learn that behaviors like teasing and bullying are harmful and affect our ability to relate to the people around us.

Making fun of others hurts everyone involved

We don’t often think about a child who makes fun of others as being a victim. But in reality, cruel behavior often disguises weakness and fear.

Making fun of others can be evidence of bad behavior learned at home, or can be a sign that a child is not comfortable in their own skin.

In some cases, children who have been victims of teasing lash out at other children to protect themselves.

Teaching values begins at home. Some parents fail to put a stop to behaviors such as making fun of others, simply because they don’t see them as a problem.

It may be that in their household, it’s normal to make unkind remarks about others. When this is the case, children copy what they see.

Aggression at home

When a child is making fun of others, it’s worth finding out why. A lack of affection or aggression at home can trigger bullying in children.

Kids who grow up in this kind of environment may take out their frustration on others, through verbal and physical attacks on their apparently weaker peers.

All parents should understand that making fun of others can trigger aggressive behavior in their child. It can also affect their performance at school and undermine their ability to form meaningful relationships with others.

In terms of discipline, parents who observe their children engaging in bullying must take action immediately.

Educating children on matters of emotions and relationships is something that takes time. Teaching a child not to make fun of others means helping them see that this kind of behavior is wrong.

Inviting children to put themselves in the other person’s place is one way to do this, by encouraging empathy.

Teaching Your Child not to Make Fun of Others

Making fun of others can lead to rejection, bad grades at school, low self-esteem, increased aggression and insecurity. It also exacerbates aggression and insecurity. It goes against every rule of social behavior.

Show them that others could do the same to them

When a child is making fun of others, they are trying to take control of a situation and get attention. This might be the only way to relate to others they know.

The best way to put a stop to this behavior is by talking to your child. Explain the damage it does to others, and how unpleasant it is to be on the receiving end.

It’s also important to show your child that making fun of others involves a risk. If they continue to do it, others may also decide to make fun of them or be aggressive towards them.

Lead by example

Parents must be a good role model and practice what they preach. It’s also important to reinforce positive behavior by praising the child when they do the right thing.

Love and affection are vital for teaching children not to make fun of others. A child who feels loved is less insecure, and far less likely to resort to aggression.

Respect and tolerance: fundamental values

When the child understands the damage caused by cruel words, they’ll learn to accept other people and respect their differences.

Developing values such as respect and tolerance will help your child to get along with others. As well as giving them a happier childhood, you’ll help them to grow up into a better person in the future.

Parental introspection

To teach your child not to make fun of others, it’s important to reflect on your own behavior.

Parents with low self-esteem who have difficulty forming friendships won’t be able to lead by example. For this reason, moms and dads must know and value themselves to help their children do the same.

What if my child is being teased?

When our children are on the receiving end of teasing or bullying, it’s especially important for parents to teach security and show them not to fear what others say about them. One strategy may include using humor to deflect cruel remarks.

If your child is being made fun of, offer them love and understanding. Reinforce their self-esteem and teach them to be true to themselves, regardless of what others may say.

 

If you liked this article, you can find more interesting topics in our blog www.tip4mom.com

Visita también nuestro sitio en Español www.paratimami.com

 

Janita

Source: www.youaremom.com

Aluminum-Free Deodorants That Really Work

Aluminum-Free Deodorants That Really Work

Become conscious about what you put on your body, especially when it comes to the armpits area. In this article you will find the top-five natural deodorants that really work and keep you safe from those chemicals that disrupt your body.

 

NATIVE

Take Care of Your Body. It’s The Only Place You Have to Live.

INVEST IN YOURSELF

 

 

 

  • Native was founded in San Francisco, California, and all of our products are hand poured in the United States.
  • We never use aluminum, parabens or sulfates in any of our products. We also never test on animals, except humans who volunteer. #NoCompromises.
  • We offer free shipping on every order and we’re so confident you’ll love Native that we’ll cover the cost of return shipping if you’re unhappy (but you won’t be).

 

type:A

Our skin is our largest organ and absorbs whatever we slather onto it. And our underarms in particular are a sensitive area full of nodes, glands, and arteries.

Meet type:A deo. Powered by natural ingredients and sweat-activated technology™ for long-lasting odor and wetness protection.

  • Non-toxic deodorant that won’t irritate your skin
  • Lightweight cream that won’t stain your clothes
  • Leaping Bunny certified cruelty-free
  • Free returns, no questions asked

 

 

KOPARI

The Cleaner the Deodorant, the Happier the Pits

Empower your pits and arm your underarms with pure coconut confidence. This aluminum-free deodorant glides on clear. Never sticky, always awesome, it’ll outlast your longest days and leave you smelling like fresh coconut milk. Don’t sweat it.

No Aluminum. No Baking Soda. No Parabens. No Silicone. No Phthalates. No Kidding.

LOVE beauty AND planet

Your underarms are in for a treat! If you’ve been looking for a vegan deodorant that works, ours are made with signature ingredients and plant-based deodorizers to protect you from odor for 24 hours. They’re also beautifully scented for long-lasting freshness and crafted without aluminum, alcohol, or parabens!

 

Tom’s of Maine

Natural deodorant to keep you smelling fresh and antiperspirant to help keep you dry. We’ve got the choices to give your underams the attention they deserve.

Safe and Hardworking Natural Ingredients

In making products for you, we strive for transparency and quality in ingredients. We want to help you make the choices that are right for you and your family! Learn about the naturally sourced and derived ingredients included in Tom’s of Maine natural personal care products.

 

 

 

If you liked this article, you can find more interesting topics in our blog www.tip4mom.com

Lee la versión en Español de este artículo haciendo click en el siguiente link https://www.paratimami.com/2019/04/11/desodorantes-sin-aluminio-que-si-funcionan/

 

Janita

Janita

Thumb-sucking: Why it happens and what to do about it

Thumb-sucking: Why it happens and what to do about it

Sucking on thumbs, fingers, pacifiers or other objects is a natural reflex for children. It may make babies feel secure and happy and help them learn about their world.

Why it happens

Kids suck their thumbs because it’s comforting and calming. Your preschooler probably practiced this habit while she was still in the womb and perfected it as an infant.

Now she turns to her thumb when she’s tired, scared, bored, sick, or trying to adjust to challenges such as starting daycare or preschool. She may also use her thumb to help her fall asleep at bedtime and to lull herself back to sleep when she wakes up in the middle of the night.

What to do about thumb-sucking

Don’t worry too much. The American Dental Association says most children can safely suck their thumb – without damaging the alignment of their teeth or jaws – until their permanent teeth begin to appear. (Permanent teeth don’t usually start to erupt until around age 6.)

Keep in mind, too, that not all thumb-sucking is equally damaging; experts say it’s the intensity of the sucking and the tongue’s thrust that deforms teeth and makes braces necessary later. Kids who rest their thumbs passively in their mouths are less likely to have dental problems than children who suck aggressively.

Observe your child’s technique. If she sucks vigorously, you may want to begin curbing her habit earlier, say around age 4. If you notice any changes in her mouth or teeth, or if you’re unsure whether your child’s thumb-sucking is causing problems, consult your dentist.

If your child’s thumb becomes red and chapped from sucking, try applying a moisturizer while she’s sleeping. (If you apply it when she’s awake, it may just end up in her mouth.)

Most children stop thumb-sucking on their own between the ages of 2 and 4. Some continue the habit longer, but peer pressure in school is often a very effective deterrent.

Let it go. Punishing your preschooler or nagging her to get her thumb out of her mouth won’t help because she probably doesn’t even realize she’s doing it. Methods such as putting an elastic bandage on her thumb will seem like unjust punishment, especially because she indulges in the habit for comfort and security. Plus, pressuring her to stop may intensify her desire to do it even more.

Try to wait it out. Children usually give up thumb-sucking when they find other ways to calm and comfort themselves. If your child tends to suck her thumb when she’s hungry, for instance, she’ll soon learn to simply open the fridge and look for something to eat or ask you for a snack instead.

Preempt thumb-sucking with other activities. If you can identify the times and places when your preschooler is most likely to suck her thumb – while watching television, for instance – consider distracting her with a substitute activity, such as a rubber ball to squeeze or finger puppets to play with.

If she tends to suck her thumb when she’s tired, you could try letting her nap longer or moving up her bedtime. Or if she turns to her thumb when she’s frustrated, help her put her feelings into words.

The key is to notice when and where sucking occurs and try to divert her attention by offering an alternative. Together, you and your child can find solutions that will – eventually – help her kick the thumb habit.

 

Tip4Mom

You can find more interesting tips on our blog http://www.tip4mom.com

También puedes visitar nuestro blog en español https://www.paratimami.com

Source: https://www.babycenter.com

10 Things to Know About Choosing Shoes for Toddlers

10 Things to Know About Choosing Shoes for Toddlers

Baby’s first steps mark an exciting time of transition to toddlerhood and a whole new world to explore! It also means your baby is ready for some proper footwear. We spoke to pediatric podiatrist Dr. Louis DeCaro, president of the American College of Foot & Ankle Pediatrics and a father of two toddlers, about what a mama needs to know when it comes to first shoes.

1. They’re for Protection

Unusually poor coordination, poor balance, and bad posture are some signs that a little one might have a developmental issue. Other signs are premature fatigue—if your child requests to be carried frequently—and exceptional clumsiness. If your child exhibits any of these behaviors, take him in for a screening. Pain is usually not the overriding symptom in pediatric podiatry cases.

2. Think Flexible

Above all,  toddler’s first pair of shoes should be flexible, says Dr. DeCaro. It’s important to avoid shoes that are too stiff because they could impede foot development. Parents should also seek out shoes that are lightweight and made from breathable and natural materials.

3. You Don’t Have to Spend a Lot

It’s not necessary to buy very expensive shoes for toddlers, according to Dr. DeCaro. And while a recommendation from the American Podiatric Medical Association (APMA) indicates that the shoes are of good quality and developmentally appropriate, parents shouldn’t feel it’s essential to seek out shoes bearing their Seal of Acceptance.

4. It’s Best to Get Professionally Fitted

In an ideal world, parents would have their child’s foot measured with every pair of new shoes. Children have flat feet until their arches develop at about age four, and that can affect the way shoes fit, says Dr. DeCaro. Try to have your child’s foot measured and shoes fitted by a professional whenever possible.

5. At Home, Use the Pinky

If you’re unable to get your child’s shoes professionally fitted, you can check for fit by using your pinky finger—not your thumb—to gauge how much space your child has in the toe box of the shoes, Dr. DeCaro suggested. The shoes are well-fitting in that area when there is a pinky’s width of room between the tips of the child’s  toes and the toe of the shoe. After the first few times of wearing, check your child’s feet for red marks or indents; if there are any that don’t go away after 10 minutes, the shoes aren’t a good fit and are probably uncomfortable.

6. Transition Shoes When They’re Running

Keep little ones in very flexible shoes until they start running a lot or playing sports—usually around age four or five. That’s about the time a child’s arch begins forming.

7. Kids Grow Fast!

On average, children’s feet can grow three-quarters to a full size larger every three to four months, according to Dr. DeCaro. He recommends checking the fit of your child’s shoes quarterly, or when their shoes are worn out, whichever comes first.

8. Screen Early if There’s a History

Genetics are the best predictor of future foot problems, Dr. DeCaro points out, so it’s important to get your child screened early if there is any history of major foot problems in your family. Parents with flat feet or other issues should take their child to a pediatric podiatrist as soon as their little one is walking.

9. Watch for Signs of Trouble

You’ve been dealing with Braxton-Hicks or “practice” contractions for a while now, but one day things are going to ramp up. That first real contraction is typically unmistakable. Try to relax and go with the flow—no amount of planning is going to make this adventure go exactly the way you expect. The good news? Baby is almost here!

10. Secondhand Are OK

Although many experts discourage them, Dr. DeCaro doesn’t have any issues with used and hand-me-down shoes. Secondhand shoes that are in good shape and fit well are fine for toddlers to wear, he says.

 

You can find more interesting tips on our blog http://www.tip4mom.com

También puedes visitar nuestro blog en español https://www.paratimami.com

Source: https://www.mom365.com

Photo: https://www.pexels.com

7 Newborn Sleep Tips From The Baby Sleep Whisperer

7 Newborn Sleep Tips From The Baby Sleep Whisperer

If we had a genie’s lamp, “better sleep for everyone in the family” would definitely be at the top of our wish list.

But until that magical day arrives, we did the next best thing. We spoke to a real-life newborn sleep whisperer – Ingrid Prueher, a pediatric sleep consultant, lactation counselor and founder of BabySleepWhisperer.com. She’s a former Wall Street analyst who became a sleep aficionado after the birth of her second son. He kept waking up every few hours at night, so Prueher used her love of data and research to get him in a good bedtime routine. Now she’s on a mission to help families around the country get in tip-top sleep shape too.

Prueher uses a “five-layer cake” approach. That means laying a solid sleep foundation and then applying a training method, aka the icing. With a little groundwork, good sleep can become a reality.

“My youngest client has been a day old and my oldest client has been 71 years old,” Prueher says. “It’s never too late to get healthy sleep habits in your life and make sleep a priority.”

Here are some of her tips for cracking the code to a better night’s sleep for your newborn.

1. Go back to square one.

Baby’s cranky during the day, waking up multiple times during the night and can’t fall asleep without you. To get sleep back on track, Prueher says to start from scratch. Concentrate on sleep for a good two weeks like when baby first came home from the hospital. Use that time to get nap and feeding times running smoothly, perfect the nursery and eliminate negative sleep associations, like being rocked or fed in order to fall asleep.

“In their first three months of life, you want to help them transition from the womb into our world. After that point, if your child has never slept well, start with some basics,” Prueher says. “Treat it like you’re back to newborn days where you stayed home and focused on all of these things.”

That doesn’t mean never leaving the house or taking an extended staycation. But you might have to press pause on play dates and limit baby’s jam-packed schedule until they’re sleeping through the night. Because baby’s first and second naps are so mentally and physically restorative, Prueher suggests saving errands until second nap is over.

“Change your mindset and make sleep a priority, so you can find what the natural rhythm of the child is,” she says.

2. Know thy baby.

Perhaps it’s no surprise that Prueher is a huge fan of analytics! She recommends taking note of everything surrounding sleep, from diet to mood, then looking for trends in the data. Knowledge is power when it comes to figuring out your baby’s best sleep. Be on the lookout for clues. For example, if baby’s really happy, then starts staring off into space, it may be a way of saying, “Hey guys, I wanna go to bed!” Watch for signs of sleepiness like heavy eyes, redness in the face and even hyperactivity.

“Things like tugging on their ear, yawning a lot and starting to get cranky means the child is starting to get in an overtired state,” Prueher says. “But parents aren’t necessarily going to know that right away, so I want them to start logging it because then they start learning.”

3. Designate a sleep zone.

Life is unpredictable, but baby’s sleep shouldn’t be. Until your child’s in a good place sleep-wise, limit zzz’s to one area of the house, like the nursery. No napping wherever baby’s heart pleases. No dozing off in Mom’s arms or the stroller.

“Just for reset purposes, I don’t recommend having the child sleep everywhere,” Prueher says. “Give them a place to rest. A true place to rest. They will become more flexible later on once you teach them to actually sleep.”

4. Make sleep a team sport.

Setting up a routine and establishing positive visual and verbal sleep cues (pulling down the shades, reading a book, coming up with a catchphrase like “It’s time to go to bed!”) are great. But none of it will matter if Mom follows one routine at night, the nanny follows a different one during the day and Grandma does her own thing on the weekends. Get everyone in on the sleep plan – yes, even Grandma! – so that baby’s not caught off guard.

“Anyone who takes care of the child at the parents’ home should be on the same page. You don’t want to do different things because you’re only confusing the child,” Prueher says. “It’s not about everything being exactly the same every single day all day long, but there’s got to be some predictability.”

5. Don’t underestimate the power of milk.

Milk matters. It really, really matters, even when baby starts eating solids around four to six months. They’ll need less milk as they get older. But if baby’s still waking up in the middle of the night to feed, it could mean they’re not getting enough milk during the day.

“A lot of what I see, especially after the doctor has given the okay for the child to start having solids, is that parents just jump into the solids way too fast,” Prueher says. “The child will get to the point where they just eat solids all day long, but then look for milk all night long.”

They might be looking for more than just milk, though. Multiple nighttime wakeups may also indicate a negative sleep association.

“If a child has 10 ounces typically and when they wake up at night they only have two or five ounces, you know they’re not waking up to feed, they’re waking up out of habit,” Prueher says. “And that’s because a sleep association is there – ‘feed to sleep.’”

Prueher advises taking note of how many ounces baby normally consumes or how long they breastfeed, then comparing that to their feeding rituals at night. That’ll help determine if the behavior is driven by a need for milk or a need for you.

6. Practice what you preach.

Infants are like small, very cute detectives. They can tell when parents are wishy-washy about sleep or don’t mean business. “Think about the people you trust in your life,” says Prueher. “They mean what they say and they follow through.”

As babies get older, they could even be affected by your own not-so-great sleep habits. If you don’t take sleep seriously, why should they? “Children learn visually, they will pick up on it,” Prueher says.

7. You do you.

Every baby is different with varying sleep needs, cues and habits. Prueher’s first son was a “stellar sleeper.” Her second son? Not so much. That’s why it’s important to figure out what’s best for baby and you. Even if that means ignoring tips from your well-meaning next-door neighbor.

“When you get advice, you have to take it with a grain of salt,” Prueher says. “It’s all about finding what works for your child.”

If you still need tips for getting your baby to sleep, the Nanit baby monitor offers customized sleep tips based on your child’s sleep patterns. It’s like having a sleep expert in your home.

 

Source: https://www.nanit.com/blog/7-newborn-sleep-tips/