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Gestational Carriers (Surrogacy)

Gestational Carriers (Surrogacy)

What is gestational surrogacy?

Gestational surrogacy is an arrangement in which a woman carries and delivers a baby for another person or couple. The woman who carries the baby is the gestational surrogate, or gestational carrier. The parents-to-be are known as the intended parents, and they are involved in the pregnancy, can be present at the birth, and become the child’s parents after the baby is born.

In gestational surrogacy, the baby isn’t genetically related to the gestational surrogate – the egg comes from the intended mother or an egg donor, and the sperm comes from the intended father or a sperm donor. Donor embryos may also be used.

Without a donor embryo, in vitro fertilization (IVF) is necessary because eggs from one woman are used to create embryos to be implanted in another woman’s uterus. In IVF, fertilization occurs after eggs and sperm are combined in a laboratory. One or more of the resulting embryos are then transferred to the gestational surrogate’s uterus.

Only 1 percent of all assisted reproductive technology procedures involve gestational surrogacy. It’s likely that cost is a major factor preventing more people from using a gestational surrogate.

Is using a gestational surrogate for me?

Using a gestational surrogate may be a good option if:

  • You don’t have a uterus.
  • You have problems with your uterus.
  • You can’t carry a pregnancy safely.
  • Other fertility treatments have failed.
  • You’re a single man or gay male couple.

What are the challenges of gestational surrogacy?

Whether you set up the arrangement through an agency or negotiate it privately, using a gestational surrogate is a legally complex and emotionally intense process. If you decide to go this route, be prepared to commit a lot of time, money, and patience.

Currently, a handful of states allow gestational surrogacy contracts, but they aren’t always enforceable, depending on what’s legal. Some states require couples to be married, and some don’t allow gestational surrogates to be compensated. Also, there may be requirements about sexual orientation.

Most states don’t have specific laws covering gestational surrogacy, so it’s important to work with a licensed attorney in your state who has expertise in third-party reproduction. An attorney can advise you on your options and draft a legally binding contract. 

We’ve decided to try gestational surrogacy. How do we get started?

Get ready for a complex process that can be stressful. Although you won’t carry the baby, you’ll be very involved in the pregnancy. You’ll probably pay the gestational surrogate’s expenses, including medical appointments, health insurance bills, travel costs, legal bills, and agency fees (if you’re using one). Here’s how to get started:

1. Find a gestational surrogate. Decide whether to ask a relative or friend to be the gestational surrogate, or use an agency that can match you with someone. Most experts recommend choosing someone who:

  • Is between 21 and 45 years old
  • Previously gave birth without any complications
  • Has a supportive family
  • Is in good physical and emotional health

2. See a fertility counselor. Most doctors require that you and the gestational surrogate speak with a mental health professional (individually and together) to help you consider the pros and cons of the arrangement, process your emotions, and discuss the potential impact of a relationship with each other.

3. Schedule a medical exam for the genetic parents. If you’re using your own eggs or sperm, you’ll have a checkup and genetic evaluation to make sure you’re healthy enough for IVF. (If you’re using donated sperm, eggs, or a donor embryo, they’ll be screened during the donation process.)

4. Schedule exams for the gestational surrogate. She’ll need to have a medical exam and drug screen, and her partner or spouse will undergo psychological and medical screening as well.

5. Sign a legal agreement.You and the gestational surrogate should each hire separate attorneys experienced in gestational surrogacy to avoid potential conflicts of interest. Create a legal agreement that protects everyone and includes such important details as compensation, parental rights, legal custody, delivery location, future contact between the parties, insurance coverage, and control over medical decisions made during the pregnancy.
In some states, as long as one parent is genetically related to the baby, the gestational surrogate signs away parental rights before the baby’s birth, and the intended parents’ names are listed on the birth certificate. In other states, the gestational surrogate signs over parental rights after the baby is born.

How does gestational surrogacy work with fresh eggs?

Your doctor uses IVF to produce one or more embryos that will be transferred to the surrogate. Here’s how it works:

  • Match menstrual cycles. If you’re using your own egg, you and the gestational surrogate take medication to synchronize your menstrual cycles. That way, the surrogate’s uterus will be ready to support an embryo by the time your eggs are retrieved and fertilized. (Similarly, an egg donor will need to sync her cycle with the surrogate.)
  • Stimulate egg production. Once you (or the egg donor) are in sync with the surrogate, taking gonadotropins stimulates the ovaries to develop multiple eggs.
  • Fertilize the eggs. When mature eggs are ready to be fertilized, the doctor retrieves them during a minor outpatient procedure. Unless you’re using donor sperm, the intended father may need to provide a sperm sample at this time. Then the eggs are fertilized in the laboratory.
  • Transfer embryos. After fertilization, the embryos are transferred to the surrogate’s uterus.

The surrogate becomes pregnant when at least one embryo implants in her uterus. The chance of a successful pregnancy varies with the age of the woman who provided the egg.

How does gestational surrogacy work with frozen eggs?

Here’s how gestational surrogacy works when using frozen eggs:

  • Take medication. The surrogate takes medication over several weeks to prepare her uterus for a possible pregnancy.
  • Thaw and fertilize the eggs. Unless you’re using donor sperm, the intended father may need to provide a sperm sample, so the eggs can be fertilized in a laboratory.
  • Transfer embryos. After fertilization, the embryos are transferred to the surrogate’s uterus.

The surrogate becomes pregnant when at least one embryo implants in her uterus. The chance of a successful pregnancy varies with the age of the woman who provided the egg.

How does gestational surrogacy work with frozen embryos?

Using frozen embryos is similar to the process for using frozen eggs. Menstrual cycles don’t need to be synced, and the surrogate only needs to take medication to prepare her uterus for a possible pregnancy before the embryos are thawed and transferred into her uterus.

How long does gestational surrogacy take?

Finding a healthy, willing gestational surrogate can take months or even years, whether you screen candidates through an agency, decide to ask a friend or relative, or search for someone online.

Once you’ve finalized the agreement and have begun treatment, it can take at least three or four IVF cycles to achieve a successful pregnancy. Each IVF cycle takes four to six weeks.

What’s the success rate for gestational surrogacy?

Using your own eggs, your chance of having a baby through gestational surrogacy is as good as or higher than that of a woman your age using traditional IVF.

Recent national data on gestational surrogate IVF cycles using the intended mother’s eggs show the following live birth rates per cycle (ages refer to the intended mothers’ age):

  • 51 percent for women age 34 and younger
  • 49 percent for women age 35 to 37
  • 38 percent for women age 38 to 40
  • 21 percent for women age 41 to 42
  • 10 percent for women age 43 and older

With frozen embryos using the intended mother’s eggs, the birth rates per cycle were:

  • 46 percent for women age 34 and younger
  • 46 percent for women age 35 to 37
  • 42 percent for women age 38 to 40
  • 38 percent for women age 41 to 42
  • 22 percent for women age 43 and older

The donor egg data in the national report wasn’t grouped by age, but it showed that the overall live birth rate was 64 percent when fresh donor eggs were used in gestational surrogacy. When frozen donor eggs were used, the birth rate was 42 percent. When frozen embryos created from donor eggs were used, the birth rate was 51 percent.

What are the pros of gestational surrogacy?

  • If you and your partner are unable to conceive or carry a pregnancy to term, using a gestational surrogate can give you the chance to parent your own biological child.
  • You can be intimately involved in the details of your gestational surrogate’s pregnancy.

What are the cons of gestational surrogacy?

  • In addition to the possible side effects from fertility medication, your gestational surrogate goes through the discomfort and usual risks of pregnancy.
  • Using a gestational surrogate is expensive and legally complex. It involves intricate contracts and arrangements. In several states, using a gestational surrogate is illegal, which usually means that people must contract with a gestational surrogate who delivers in a surrogacy-friendly state.
  • You not only experience the usual suspense and anxiety of waiting for a pregnancy to safely reach full term, you may also have to deal with friends and relatives who don’t understand why you chose gestational surrogacy.
  • You might worry about legal snags and the possibility that your gestational surrogate could back out and not carry your baby. If she goes ahead with it, you might worry that she’ll have a hard time letting the baby go.

How much does gestational surrogacy cost?

The cost for gestational surrogacy depends on factors including your health insurance, the gestational surrogate’s expenses, and the cost of IVF where you live. Relatives or friends who serve as a gestational surrogate usually aren’t paid.

Most people find a gestational surrogate through an agency, and the cost can be almost $150,000. Here’s an estimated breakdown:

  • Agency fee: $22,000
  • Gestational surrogate fee: $25,000 to $35,000, though compensation is typically higher for a multiple pregnancy
  • Health insurance: $15,000 to $30,000 for supplemental or special coverage for the gestational surrogate
  • Gestational surrogate’s nonmedical expenses: $10,000 to $15,000
  • Legal fees: $14,000
  • Counseling services: $7,000
  • IVF: Up to $20,000 (Gestational surrogacy IVF is generally more expensive than traditional IVF, which averages around $12,400.)

 

If you liked this article, you can find more interesting topics in our blog www.tip4mom.com

Visita también nuestro sitio en Español www.paratimami.com

 

Janita

Janita

Source: www.babycenter.com

Thumb-sucking: Why it happens and what to do about it

Thumb-sucking: Why it happens and what to do about it

Sucking on thumbs, fingers, pacifiers or other objects is a natural reflex for children. It may make babies feel secure and happy and help them learn about their world.

Why it happens

Kids suck their thumbs because it’s comforting and calming. Your preschooler probably practiced this habit while she was still in the womb and perfected it as an infant.

Now she turns to her thumb when she’s tired, scared, bored, sick, or trying to adjust to challenges such as starting daycare or preschool. She may also use her thumb to help her fall asleep at bedtime and to lull herself back to sleep when she wakes up in the middle of the night.

What to do about thumb-sucking

Don’t worry too much. The American Dental Association says most children can safely suck their thumb – without damaging the alignment of their teeth or jaws – until their permanent teeth begin to appear. (Permanent teeth don’t usually start to erupt until around age 6.)

Keep in mind, too, that not all thumb-sucking is equally damaging; experts say it’s the intensity of the sucking and the tongue’s thrust that deforms teeth and makes braces necessary later. Kids who rest their thumbs passively in their mouths are less likely to have dental problems than children who suck aggressively.

Observe your child’s technique. If she sucks vigorously, you may want to begin curbing her habit earlier, say around age 4. If you notice any changes in her mouth or teeth, or if you’re unsure whether your child’s thumb-sucking is causing problems, consult your dentist.

If your child’s thumb becomes red and chapped from sucking, try applying a moisturizer while she’s sleeping. (If you apply it when she’s awake, it may just end up in her mouth.)

Most children stop thumb-sucking on their own between the ages of 2 and 4. Some continue the habit longer, but peer pressure in school is often a very effective deterrent.

Let it go. Punishing your preschooler or nagging her to get her thumb out of her mouth won’t help because she probably doesn’t even realize she’s doing it. Methods such as putting an elastic bandage on her thumb will seem like unjust punishment, especially because she indulges in the habit for comfort and security. Plus, pressuring her to stop may intensify her desire to do it even more.

Try to wait it out. Children usually give up thumb-sucking when they find other ways to calm and comfort themselves. If your child tends to suck her thumb when she’s hungry, for instance, she’ll soon learn to simply open the fridge and look for something to eat or ask you for a snack instead.

Preempt thumb-sucking with other activities. If you can identify the times and places when your preschooler is most likely to suck her thumb – while watching television, for instance – consider distracting her with a substitute activity, such as a rubber ball to squeeze or finger puppets to play with.

If she tends to suck her thumb when she’s tired, you could try letting her nap longer or moving up her bedtime. Or if she turns to her thumb when she’s frustrated, help her put her feelings into words.

The key is to notice when and where sucking occurs and try to divert her attention by offering an alternative. Together, you and your child can find solutions that will – eventually – help her kick the thumb habit.

 

Tip4Mom

You can find more interesting tips on our blog http://www.tip4mom.com

También puedes visitar nuestro blog en español https://www.paratimami.com

Source: https://www.babycenter.com

Is it normal to have abdominal pain during pregnancy?

Is it normal to have abdominal pain during pregnancy?

Occasional abdominal pain during pregnancy is a common and often harmless complaint, but it can also be a sign of a serious problem. Never ignore severe or persistent abdominal pain. Call your healthcare provider if your pain doesn’t go away after several minutes of rest, or if you also have any of the following:

  • Vaginal spotting or bleeding
  • Unusual vaginal discharge
  • Chills or fever
  • Lightheadedness
  • Pain or discomfort while urinating
  • Nausea and vomiting

 

Is it normal to have mild pain with cramping during pregnancy?

Yes, a little bit of pain with cramping in early pregnancy is common. Later in pregnancy, cramps might be harmless Braxton-Hicks contractions or round ligament pain. And occasional mild cramps throughout pregnancy without any other symptoms are usually nothing to worry about.

When is it not normal to have pain with cramping during pregnancy?

It’s not normal to have cramping during pregnancy with pain that’s severe, persistent, or accompanied by other symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, vaginal bleeding, headache, or fever. Pain with cramps and vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy can be a sign of ectopic pregnancy or miscarriage.

It’s also not normal to have any pain in the upper abdomen. And if your abdomen is unusually sensitive to touch, especially when pressure is released, a serious abdominal infection (peritonitis) could be the culprit.

What causes harmless abdominal pain during pregnancy?

Not all abdominal pain during pregnancy is a sign of a serious problem. Common causes of minor abdominal pain include:

Gas and bloating: You’re much more likely to have gas pain and bloating during pregnancy because of hormones that slow your digestion and the pressure of your growing uterus on your stomach and intestines.

Constipation: Pregnancy hormones that slow down your digestion and the pressure of your growing uterus on your rectum can lead to constipation.

Cramping during orgasm: You may notice a bit of cramping during or right after an orgasm. As long as it’s mild and short-lived, it’s perfectly normal and nothing to be alarmed about.

Round ligament pain: Round ligament pain is generally a brief, sharp, stabbing pain or a dull ache that you may feel on one or both sides of your lower abdomen or deep in your groin. It usually starts in your second trimester when the ligaments in your pelvis that support your uterus begin to stretch and thicken to accommodate its growing size.

You may feel a short, sharp pain if you suddenly change position, such as when you get out of bed or up from a chair or when you cough, roll over in bed, or get out of the bathtub. Or you may feel a dull ache after an especially active day. Call your provider if this discomfort continues even after you’ve rested.

Braxton Hicks contractions: After midpregnancy, you may start to feel a tightening sensation in your uterus from time to time. Before 37 weeks, these Braxton Hicks contractions should be infrequent, irregular, and essentially painless. (Once you’re close to your due date, this type of cramping during pregnancy can be a sign of labor.)

Call your provider if:

  • The contractions are accompanied by lower back pain.
  • You feel more than six contractions an hour (even if they don’t hurt).
  • The contractions are coming at regular intervals.
  • You also have vaginal discharge or bleeding.
  • You have any other signs of premature labor.

 

What serious problems cause abdominal pain during pregnancy?

An ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilized egg implants outside the uterus, typically in one of the fallopian tubes. It may cause cramping in early pregnancy and other symptoms.

Miscarriage is the loss of a pregnancy in the first 20 weeks. Vaginal spotting or bleeding is usually the first symptom, followed by abdominal pain a few hours to a few days later.

Placental abruption is a life-threatening condition in which your placenta separates from your uterus, partially or completely, before your baby is born.

Preeclampsia is a serious pregnancy complication that causes changes in your blood vessels and can affect organs including your liver, kidneys, brain, and the placenta. You’re diagnosed with preeclampsia if you have high blood pressure after 20 weeks of pregnancy and protein in your urine, liver or kidney abnormalities, persistent headaches, or vision changes.

Being pregnant makes you more susceptible to urinary tract infections of all kinds, including kidney infections. It’s important to call your provider if you think you might have a bladder infection because it can lead to a kidney infection, which can cause serious illness and premature labor if left untreated.

 

Other causes of abdominal pain during pregnancy

Many other conditions can cause abdominal pain, whether you’re pregnant or not. Some of the most common causes of abdominal pain during pregnancy include:

  • Stomach virus
  • Food poisoning
  • Appendicitis
  • Kidney stones
  • Hepatitis
  • Gallbladder disease
  • Pancreatitis
  • Fibroids
  • Bowel obstruction

Both gallbladder disease and pancreatitis are often a result of gallstones, which are more common during pregnancy. Fibroids may grow during pregnancy and cause discomfort. And the pressure of the growing uterus on previously scarred intestinal tissue may cause bowel obstruction, which is most likely to occur in the third trimester.

Is there anything I can do to relieve abdominal pain during pregnancy?

If you have minor pain and no symptoms of anything more serious, try these tips to relieve abdominal pain:

  • Move around or do some gentle exercises to relieve gas pain.
  • Take a warm (not hot) bath or shower.
  • Bend toward a pain for relief.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. (Dehydration can cause Braxton Hicks contractions.)
  • Try lying down. This might relieve pain caused by Braxton Hicks contractions.

 

Tip4Mom

Source:  https://www.babycenter.com

10 Foods You Shouldn’t Buy Organic – And 12 You Should

10 Foods You Shouldn’t Buy Organic – And 12 You Should

Grocery stores now have entire aisles packed with everything from organic pasta to all-natural soap. Sold at higher prices than conventional products, organic items aren’t produced with synthetic pesticides or chemical fertilizers. They’re also not processed with food additives or irradiation (radiation exposure).

But are the higher prices for these theoretically safer products really worth it? A study by researchers at Stanford University reveals organic products aren’t necessarily more nutritional, nor are they less susceptible to contamination. From their report:

The review yielded scant evidence that conventional foods posed greater health risks than organic products. While researchers found that organic produce had a 30 percent lower risk of pesticide contamination than conventional fruits and vegetables, organic foods are not necessarily 100 percent free of pesticides. What’s more, as the researchers noted, the pesticide levels of all foods generally fell within the allowable safety limits.

Foods you shouldn’t buy organic

The thick skins on many fruits and vegetables protect them from pesticides. While pesticides may linger on banana peels, for example, we obviously don’t eat the peels. Many products also lack pesticides because they don’t attract as many insects and harmful organisms. Here’s 10 where organic is expensive overkill.

  1. Avocados
  2. Bananas
  3. Pineapple
  4. Asparagus
  5. Broccoli
  6. Onions
  7. Kiwi
  8. Cabbage
  9. Cantaloupe
  10. Sweet Corn

Foods you should buy organic

Despite the Stanford study’s statement that there’s no indication pesticides on conventionally-grown foods are harmful, many people are still willing to pay extra to avoid pesticides on their food. So where will you get the biggest bang for your organic food buck? Mentioned on the Environmental Working Group’s 2015 “Dirty Dozen” list, these foods are among the worst offenders.

  1. Apples
  2. Peaches
  3. Nectarines
  4. Strawberries
  5. Grapes
  6. Celery
  7. Spinach
  8. Sweet bell peppers
  9. Cucumbers
  10. Cherry tomatoes
  11. Snap Peas (Imported)
  12. Potatoes

They also mention one additional item, hot peppers.

The best way to save on organic food

In addition to the tools you’d use to save on anything – comparison shopping, buying in bulk, using coupons, etc. – the best way to save on organically grown food is to buy it locally. Local farmers markets and family farms are a great way to get fresh organic food for less and support your local community. See sites like Local Harvest for ideas in your area.

 

Alejandra Jimenez

www.tip4mom.com

 

Source: https://www.moneytalksnews.com

Image: http://youcleanupgood.com

5 Mindfulness Apps Worthy of Your Attention

5 Mindfulness Apps Worthy of Your Attention

Mindfulness apps are trending in a big way. Here are five we’re happy we downloaded.

There’s no shortage of mindfulness and meditation apps these days, promising to help you combat anxiety, sleep better, hone your focus, and more. We scoured the app stores to find the most popular, educational, and easy-to-use mindfulness apps that are available for free.

1) Insight Timer

insight timer app screenshotAvailable for iOS and Android

Insight Timer is one of the most popular free meditation apps out there, and it’s easy to see why. The app features more than 4,000 guided meditations from over 1,000 teachers—on topics like self-compassion, nature, and stress—plus talks and podcasts. If you prefer a quieter meditation, you can always set a timer and meditate to intermittent bells or calming ambient noise.

Right from the beginning, the app feels like a community; the home screen announces, “3,045 meditating right now / Home to 1,754,800 meditators.” After you finish a meditation, you’ll learn exactly how many people were meditating “with you” during that time; by setting your location, you can even see meditators nearby and what they’re listening to.

Insight Timer doesn’t recommend step-by-step sequences of meditations to follow; it’s more like a buffet.

Despite its extensive collection, Insight Timer doesn’t show you a list of teachers—which would be helpful, especially since they feature experts like Jack KornfieldTara Brach, and Sharon Salzberg. And Insight Timer doesn’t recommend step-by-step sequences of meditations to follow; it’s more like a buffet. But these drawbacks hardly matter in the face of all the tempting choices.

2) Aura

screenshot of aura appAvailable for iOS and Android

Aura is a meditation app with a simple premise: Every day, you get a new, personalized, three-minute meditation. The same meditation never repeats; according to cofounder Daniel Lee, Aura’s teachers are constantly recording new tracks.

To personalize the experience, Aura initially asks about your age and how stressed, optimistic, and interested in mindfulness you are. The daily meditation that appears also depends on your mood: If you’re feeling great, Aura might suggest “Your Brilliant Heart;” select stressed, and you might get “You Have the Power.” If you like the day’s meditation, you can save it to your library for later listening.

Aura claims to target stress, anxiety, and depression. If a short meditation isn’t enough, you can also listen to relaxing sounds or try their Mindful Breather feature, where you synchronize your breath to an animated circle that gently expands and contracts—surprisingly effective. The home screen encourages you to jot down something you’re grateful for, another tool for well-being.

Aura is straightforward and sparse, but that’s part of the beauty. Particularly if you’re just getting started, or you don’t have lots of time to meditate, the simplicity of one meditation a day could be just what you need.

3) Omvana

omvana app screenshotAvailable for iOS and Android

Sleek and image-heavy, Omvana is a beautiful meditation app created by personal growth company Mindvalley. Its library contains thousands of meditations, and about 75 of those are free, from “Laser Focus” to “Cat’s Purr.”

According to cofounder Vishen Lakhiani, about 50,000 people around the world meditate to their popular “6 Phase Meditation” every morning, which is recommended for intermediate practitioners. (Beginners are encouraged to start with an eight-minute “Day 1” session.) The “6 Phase Meditation” guides you through different practices over the course of 20 minutes, including forgiveness, gratitude, and connection.

When you first download Omvana, your library includes about 10 meditations; to add more, it’s necessary to navigate over to the store, and then click on Top Tracks > Free or Categories > All free. Once you find a meditation you like, clicking the “Free” button will add the track to your library.

Like Insight Timer, Omvana is more of a grab bag than a guided learning experience. And much of its library is off-limits to the free user. But if you’re looking for a solid morning meditation, or you’re overwhelmed by all the choice on Insight Timer, you might enjoy Omvana.

4) Stop, Breathe & Think

Stop, Breathe & Think app screenshotAvailable for iOS and Android

If other meditation apps expect you to dive right in, Stop, Breathe & Think wants to help you get acquainted with mindfulness first. A section called Learn to Meditate explains what mindfulness is, why it’s beneficial, and what to expect when you press play on your first track. It even covers some of the neuroscience of mindfulness and the physiology of stress, in case you’re still skeptical.

If other meditation apps expect you to dive right in, Stop, Breathe & Think wants to help you get acquainted with mindfulness first.

Then, it’s time to get started. Stop, Breathe & Think features nearly 30 free sessions, many of which come in different lengths (and different voices—from placid Jamie to friendly Grecco). Most of them are short, up to 11 minutes, and you can choose to work around themes like Breathe, Connect with Your Body, or Be Kind. Or, simply set a meditation timer and find calm amid the silence or relaxing forest sounds.

A progress page keeps track of how many days you’ve meditated in a row and your emotions, which you can record before and after each meditation. Plus, you can earn cute stickers: As a newbie, I’ve collected “Good Start” and “Tick Tock of Presence.” Stop, Breathe & Think is ideal for people who need some more structure and motivation to jumpstart their meditation habit.

5) Calm

calm app screenshotAvailable for iOS and Android

The moment you open the Calm app, you might feel a sense of…calm. Relaxing sounds of falling rain play automatically in the background, but you could also opt to be greeted by a crackling fireplace, crickets, or something called “celestial white noise.”

The relaxation continues with Calm’s free meditations, a smaller selection than several of the apps above—16 in total, some of which come in different lengths, from 3-30 minutes. You can start off with 7 Days of Calm, or try their sessions on Loving-Kindness, Forgiveness, or the Body Scan. Plus, like many other apps, you can set a timer for silent meditation or meditate to intermittent bells. For nighttime relaxation, Calm features four free “sleep stories”: bedtime stories for adults on everything from science fiction to scenic landscapes to help you transition into slumber.

Unfortunately, some of the most interesting-sounding sessions, like Commuting and Emergency Calm, are locked unless you subscribe. (Calm’s subscription costs $4.99 per month when you buy a year—one of the cheapest out there if you decide to make the investment.)

 

Tip4Mom

www.tip4mom.com

 

Source: https://www.mindful.org
Photo by Chevanon Photography from Pexels

The Many Mood Swings of the Terrible Twos

The Many Mood Swings of the Terrible Twos

The life of a two-year-old isn’t always easy.

One minute you might be happily coloring with your new markers, and the next your mom snatches them from your hand and scolds you for drawing on the wallpaper. At the moment, nothing can feel more devastating.

Anyone who’s parented a toddler knows what happens next. The young artist bursts into tears, possibly hits mom, throws the nearest object or runs away. Of course, as soon as she sees another cool, new toy, she’ll settle right down.

It’s perfectly normal to have a moody toddler, but that doesn’t make it any less frustrating. Understanding what life is like in the world of a toddler can help you learn how to deal with terrible twos.

What is time?

Your toddler has a very limited concept of time. When he wants something, all he knows is that he wants it now. Not in five minutes, not in an hour (what’s an hour, anyway?). As such, when he doesn’t get his peanut butter and jelly exactly when he’s hungry, he may think he’ll never get his sandwich, even if you’re already in the process of spreading the jelly.

In some cases, the tears will stop as soon as you hand your toddler his lunch (or whatever it is he’s asking for). In many other situations, your toddler is making a request you can’t oblige. No, he can’t play with your kitchen knife. No, he can’t have candy before dinner.

Being told “no” isn’t fun, but luckily you can use that limited concept of time to your advantage, Parents explained. You can’t take him to the park right now, but he can play with his dinosaurs or his blocks. A new distraction becomes his new focus, and he’ll be happy once more.

Learning words takes time

Your toddler knows exactly what she wants. Unfortunately, she might not have the vocabulary to dictate that want. Even if she does, it might come out sounding like slurred and garbled nonsense. If parents had a nickel for every time they asked their child “what?,” they’d have very heavy pockets.

Not being able to clearly express their wants and needs is the source behind many toddler meltdowns. When your 18-month-old wants a cup of apple juice, but doesn’t know the word “apple” and can only ask for juice, she feels frustrated when she’s handed a cup of orange. She might yell, cry or throw the juice on the ground.

In time, she’ll learn the word “apple” and know how to ask for what she wants. Until then, be careful to communicate the names of her favorite items whenever possible to help her learn. When you pick up the apple juice, say “This apple juice is yummy” or “Do you want the apple juice?”

Additionally, teaching your child some simple baby signs can help alleviate language frustrations, LiveStrong explained. For example, to sign for “apple,” make your hand into a fist with your index knuckle extended. Touch the knuckle to your cheek and twist.

Emotional intelligence doesn’t come easily

When something has upset your toddler, all he knows is there’s a burning rage inside him. He might not know the words “mad,” “sad” or “frustrated.” He probably doesn’t know how to properly express those emotions, either; he’s only just developed them, after all.

Help your toddler learn about his emotions and how to display them. When his older brother knocks over his block tower, he feels mad. He might pick up his blocks and throw them at his brother. Tell your toddler, “That must have made you feel really mad.” Vocabulary will help your child understand that feeling mad is normal. Teach him that’s it’s OK to feel mad, but not OK to throw blocks.

Help your toddler learn about all his emotions, not just the negative ones. Help him identify when he’s happy, excited, sad, frustrated or mad. In time, he’ll not only learn how to determine his own emotions, but he’ll also start recognizing these in others – the first steps toward developing empathy, Parents noted.

Dealing with tantrums isn’t easy, especially when you’re in public or witnessing the third meltdown of a very tough day. It’s important to let your toddler know that throwing a fit isn’t the way to get what he wants.

Wait for him to calm down, then get to the bottom of the problem. In time, your toddler will develop a bigger vocabulary, a realistic concept of time and the emotional intelligence to stay calm, even when frustrated – it’s all a part of growing up.

 

Tip4Mom

 

 

 

Source: https://blogs.mom365.com

Photo: https://www.pexels.com